Create a scale model of the room before buying new furniture

When buying furniture it’s sometimes hard to figure how an item is going to fit in a room. How much extra space will be around it, and how cluttered the room will feel.

To answer these questions I’ve started making tiny paper drawings so I can get a birds eye view of the room with different furniture.

If you’d like to do this all you need is a measuring tape, a pencil, some paper, a ruler, and some scissors.

First get the dimensions of the room. Measure each wall and make a quick sketch with the sizes. This is not to scale and just a way to help me remember how each wall measures.

Room Dimensions

Then, take the longest side and divide the number until it’s less than 8, the smallest side of a standard sheet of paper.

For example, the longest wall in my office is 162 inches and when I divide by 25 it gives me 6.48 which will fit neatly on a single piece of paper. Now divide every number by 25 and you’ll have a perfect scale model.

Next, on a new sheet of paper do the same with the dimensions of the furniture and then cut them out. This will allow you to move it around in your model. I was looking at new desks and wanted to get an idea of what size would fit best in my office and here is the diagram with the little desk pieces to move around.

That’s about it. Now you can get a feel for how a piece of furniture will fit and it’s really helpful for sharing your ideas with others, especially if they struggle visualizing it.

An Easy Way To Save

It’s always hard to bring down your standard of living but you need to do that in order to save more money. If that doesn’t sound appealing the next time you get a raise take the extra money and put it all in your retirement account or an emergency fund that you can’t easily access.

Your standard of living will remain the same and you’ll automatically save more.

Make Your New Years Resolutions Concrete and Actionable

At the start of a new year everyone seems to be making lists of resolutions or goals they want to accomplish. This is great, and a nice way of trying to change yourself to be better.

However, what a lot of people do is make their list vague. For example, here might be someone’s list:

  • Read more
  • Meditate more
  • Lose weight
  • Exercise

Of course, these are all admirable goals but they aren’t concrete. What does “more” mean? What is better to simply rework each:

  • Read 20 page as a day
  • Meditate 10 minutes a day
  • Lose 10 pound’s
  • Workout 3 days a week

They are still the same goals, but now you can more easily keep yourself accountable.

Farewell 2018

Daily Log Book

When you are a kid each year feels like a century, when you are an adult each year feels like a month.

The photo is of my daily log book and it’s a great time to start one. You can find this particular one on Amazon but any notebook will do.

My 2018 – A Look Back

The last week of the year is when everyone seems to be writing and publishing their own year in review posts and it seems like a great opportunity for me to spend a few minutes looking back on my year.

Biking

I started out 2018 doing a mountain bike race in January called the Whole Enchilada, which is basically riding all the trails at the USNWC, about 25 miles. My goal was to finish the race but I failed. I didn’t have the legs nor the energy to do the last trail. From this I decided I was going to step up my riding so I could complete it in 2019.

I felt like I was on track but then I crashed last month and broke my hand. I’ll be out of commission for at least another two months so it’s quit unfortunate that I will not even get to enter the one thing I was pushing myself toward.

Outside of the mountain biking I bought a gravel bike and did my first half century and also rode it to the lake a few days and worked from a hammock.

I plan to do more of that once the weather warms back up and my hand heals.

Blogging

At the end of 2017 I decided I wanted to get back into blogging and made an internal goal to maintain a streak of blogging everyday for the month of January.

I continued that streak until March and then really slacked off June through September, then picked up again October.

Publishing Schedule

Publishing everyday was a challenge but the one nice side effect is it forced me to look around at everything for content ideas. Of course, the downside is by posting so often I never had time to really sit down and write in depth pieces, but that is never my style. I like to be a curator which fits perfectly with quick posts.

For 2019 I do want to continue blogging and try to force myself out of just tweeting when I have something to say.

Work

In 2018 I had a busy year making things. First I work full time for UserScape and then run Laravel News on the side. Those two take up many hours a week. Outside of these I helped run Laracon Online, LaraJobs, I created Laravel Events, and of course published the Laravel Newsletter almost every Sunday.

Personal

Outside of biking and breaking my hand I also had Lasik at the end of November and it’s the best thing I’ve done for myself. It’s hard for me to describe going from always wearing glasses to not even thinking about them. It’s really amazing laying in bed and not having the frames dig into your head, or exercising and not having to worry about them slipping off.

I also kept a daily log book for the first time ever and looking back through it is pretty cool. I like being able to flip through the pages and remember the day. That’s not something I’ve been able to duplicate digitally. Yeah

Farewell 2018

That about sums up my year and I’m looking forward to 2019. I have a few big plans that I hope to accomplish and a lot of little things. Hopefully, I’ll keep myself accountable and focused on the positive things.

Best of luck to you in 2019!

My Strava Stats 2018

I always love the end of the year stats that companies send out based on your data. The video above is from Strava condensing all my workouts this year into a sub 2 minute video. Love it.

If you are also into tracking workouts with Strava give me a follow and once I’m over my broken hand I’ll be logging my 2019 rides. Hopefully, I’ll be able to put in even more miles.

Boxer’s Fracture

Every November there is a local mountain bike race that I enjoy competing in called a Ride-n-seek race. The goal is you and a partner have four hours to complete as many checkpoints as possible in the shortest amount of time possible.

Today was the day of the event and I got up super early to head to the race and arrived early enough to get some cool fog photos and a sunrise through the trees.

It’s been raining in my area fir weeks now and I knew it was going to muddy going into the race and indeed it was. On about the mile we hit our first little wooden bridge and I crashed. The mixture of water and leaves made it like black ice. I was on the ground in an instant.

While getting up my wrist and hand was hurting but I didn’t think it was broken until I pulled my glove off and seen a huge bulge. At that point I tried to squeeze my hand. No luck.

Swollen hand

Knowing it was bad my team mate and I pushed back to the truck, loaded up my bike, and I headed to the emergency room.

After x-rays they told me my hand was broken and that I had done something called a boxers fracture.

X-ray of my hand

According to Wikipedia A boxer’s fracture is the break of the 5th metacarpal bones of the hand near the knuckle. Occasionally it is used to refer to fractures of the 4th metacarpal as well.

They said it would require surgery and they couldn’t do it today but they did need to set it. I had no idea on the pain that I was about endure.

First they stuck my fingers in a Japanese handcuffs contraption and used gravity to start the process of pulling the bones straight. Next they set it by hand by pulling and pushing my fingers. It hurt.

Making the best of it.

At this point it was time to head home and get some rest and tomorrow I get to schedule a survey.

All this reminds me that I need to check on disability insurance. I know I’m not in an industry where we are prone to danger but you just never know.