Deploy on Friday?

There are two trains of thought on the question of should you deploy on a Friday. One believes you should deploy on Friday’s because if you have a sound system in place, you can always roll back, the other thinks it is not worth the risk.

Both of these people are correct, and if you have a complete automated deployment process complete with rollbacks, and the rollbacks are continuously tested, then sure go for it.  But in every other case, I don’t think the risk is worth it.

If it’s an emergency sure, but I’ve rarely found a deploy to be so important, it’s worth disappointing my wife and kids if it goes wrong. The risk/reward is just not close to being worth it for me. Work can wait.

 

Inktoberfest

Apparently, October is the month of festivals. Developers have Hacktoberfest where they can submit four PR’s and get a free t-shirt, and apparently, designers have Inktoberfest where they just create a drawing each day and hashtag it.

Since I like making illustrations I figured I’d give this a shot but then I realized I don’t have time to do it for the full month, so I’m just going to create when I have the time.

Here is my first for the month. It’s quick, the colors aren’t right, and it has other issues but it’s bedtime so you get what you get.

If all these festivals aren’t enough just wait till next when you can join NaNoWriMo and write your next novel. I can’t see how all these people have enough extra time on their hands to do all these. Haha

NYT: The Whistle-Blower Knows How to Write

Jane Rosenzweig writing in the New York Times about how well written the whistleblower report is:

Every semester, I encounter students who tell me variously that they hate writing, that they’d rather not write, that for the careers they aspire to they won’t need to write. I explain that no matter what careers they choose, they will have to write — reports, strategic plans, proposals and, if nothing else, many, many emails.

But I also tell them that learning to write matters because some day they may have something to say that really matters to them and possibly to the world — and they will want to convey it when the moment arrives in writing that’s clear and concise.

I really wished I would have paid more attention to writing in school. I was a spitting image of a student she describes and I never could understand why I would need to write. Now, I write all the time and wished I would have paid attention in those classes and challenged myself.

If nothing else it’s a good reminder to myself that when kids say a class or a subject is worthless I can remind them that there are reasons for it, even if you don’t see them today.

Be kind in code reviews

From the Nerdery’s documentation on code review guidance:

Be kind. Yes, a person is not their code, but writing code is a creative act. Creators are by nature intimately involved with their creation. You’re going to be critiquing another person’s creation, at a minimum, be kind when you do it. Better yet, find positive as well as negative things to say. We want both the code and the coder to be better once you’re done; don’t make it easy to reject your constructive observations by being a jerk about it.

Lot’s of other great advice in the linked document, but this one really resonated with me.